Prosthetics

Prosthetics

By Savannah Wallace

The Prosthetics module has been one of my favorite so far.

The first challenge was to go five minutes without a leg, and it was very very hard. I really enjoyed getting to do that though, because though it was unpleasant, it really was a great experience; getting to see what many people go through and struggle with.

My group members and I hopped around for fifteen minutes, then we wrote about how we felt and what happened. The following is my entry: “When I had to go five minutes

without a leg, it felt very funny. My leg got numb from being held up for so long. It was very uncomfortable. I also felt like people were looking at me differently and it made me feel different, like I wasn’t like them, that I wasn’t as good as them.”

     Challenge two was to make a prosthetic leg. We thought about all the different factors, and what we could do to make this prosthetic leg something that someone would actually want to use. Although this was obviously a hypothetical situation and no one would actually be using the leg, we still thought of the entire project in the mindset that someone would be using it. First, we scavenged for materials. We found a very thick and sturdy paper cylinder, a piece of wood, sturdy string, bubble wrap, and duct tape. Next, we began to assemble. We drilled holes into the cylinder, which would be the main part of the leg, for the string. We then used wood glue to glue the small piece of wood, the foot, to the paper cylinder, the leg. Next we ran the rope through the holes of the leg, which would hold it in place around the user. Then we decided how much bubble wrap, padding, we would need. We rolled up the padding and placed it around the top of the leg, then placed some on the inside, and used the duct tape to secure the padding in place. Lastly, we tried the prosthetic leg out. We had one of our group members try the leg out, and we tried out the different ways to tie it, so we could make an educated decision on what would be the best way to tie it onto the user.

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